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The Cuban Missile Crisis

Introduction

The Cuban Missile Crisis was the nearest incidence the universe ever came to nuclear conflict. The United States military forces were at their uppermost state of eagerness. In addition, Soviet field commanding officers in Cuba were ready to use battlefield nuclear armaments to guard the island if it was attacked. Fortunately, thanks to the courageousness of two men, Premier Nikita Khrushchev and President John F. Kennedy war were prevented. In 1962, the Soviet Union was dreadful behind America in the arms contest. Soviet artilleries were only sufficient to be initiated against Europe, but U.S. weaponries were capable of wiping the entire Soviet Union. In early quarter of the year 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev created the concept of placing intermediate variety artilleries in Cuba. A putting the soldiers at alert in Cuba would increase the Soviet premeditated arsenal and offer a real deterrent to a possible U.S. attack against the Union.

The single reason acknowledged as the fundamental reason which prevented the war was good coordination of the two gentlemen. After obtaining Fidel Castro’s endorsement, the Soviet Union coordinated quickly and clandestinely to construct missile installations in the country. On 16th October that year, President John Kennedy was given reconnaissance pictures of Soviet missile setups under erection in Cuba. After one week of guarded and strong debate in the United States government, during which Soviet representatives denied that installations for distasteful missiles were being constructed in Cuba. The president, in a televised address on 22nd October, acknowledged the innovation of the installations and declared that any nuclear projectile attack from Cuba, would be considered as an assault by the Soviet Union, and would be regarded to accordingly. He also forced a naval quarantine on Cuba to avert further Soviet deliveries of offensive military armaments from arriving there.

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During the crisis, the United States and the Soviet Union exchanged many correspondences and other communications, both official and back procedures. Khrushchev sent mails to Kennedy on the number of days in October indicating the restraint nature of the weaponry in Cuba and the peaceful intent of the Soviet Union. On October 26, Khrushchev conveyed a message to Kennedy a long, incoherent letter seemingly suggesting that the missile installations would be disassembled and personnel detached in exchange for United States guarantee that it or its substitutes would not attack Cuba. On October 27, another correspondence to Kennedy arrived from the Prime minister, suggesting that projectile installations in Cuba would be disassembled if the United States destroyed its missile setting up in Turkey.

The American government decided to disregard this second letter and acknowledge the offer given in the correspondence of October 26. Khrushchev then proclaimed on October 28 that he would take to pieces the installations and take them back to the Soviet Union, expressing his conviction that the United States would not attack Cuba. Further discussions were held to apply the October 28 agreement, together with the United States stipulate that Soviet light bombers also be detached from Cuba, and identify the exact appearance and conditions of United States declarations not to invade Cuba. The fight was prevented due to the wise deliberation of the then United States president, Kennedy and Soviet Union’s Prime Minister (Munton & Welch 144).

Conclusion

The missile crisis is regarded as the closest nuclear war the world has ever encountered. Thanks to the secret negotiations of, Khrushchev and president of then America, Kennedy. Arguably the most hazardous moment in the disaster was only documented during the Cuban Missile Crisis Havana discussion in October 2002. The single reason the war never happened is based on the fact that the two leaders deliberated well and made compromises for the sake of good existence.

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