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Regions of English Colonial America in the 1700s

Introduction

In the 1700s, there were three regions of English colonial America. These included the New England colonies, the southern colonies and the middle/mid Atlantic colonies. Some scholars argue that there was also the upper southern region referred to as Chesapeake. Each of these regions was unique with its own religion, culture, economics and system of government.

The New England colonies incorporated Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Connecticut. This region had rocky areas and poor soil. Therefore, agriculture was poor. Lumber and fisheries were the main resources. The culture in the New England region was homogeneous. The people in this region, traded with West Indies, England and French colonies to the North (McNeese 2002). Influences by John Calvin’s works and thoughts, most people in this region were Calvinists. The government established and ruled small towns instead of large metropolises. The people in this region were modern in their cultures and the way of life.

The southern colonies of British North America included Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Maryland. England got drawn to this area by the hope of finding gold and virgin lands. Plantations were the main economic force. The principal crops grown in the plantations were cash crops. They included rice, tobacco, cotton and sugarcane. The government had domination of farmers and planters. These were the men land owners (Greene 1983). The House of Representatives was called, “the House of Burgesses”. People in this region were traditional in their way of life.

The middle colonies region included New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania. The people there were a mixture of the Northern region and the Southern region. Therefore, their lifestyle was both rural and urban. The area had Protestants, Portuguese Jews, Dutch Calvinists and German Baptists (Grigg 2008). They had rich and fertile soils. Therefore, their economy depended on export of wheat and other grains. It was a royal colony ruled by a governor.

Conclusion

North America was a common destination of different white settlers. Therefore, these three regions were distinct from each other. Each of the regions had unique characteristics. These characteristics depended on the Europeans who settled in the areas.