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Lynching and Internment: Where is the End?

In spite of the fact that modern society tends to be humanistic and professes Christian law and philosophy, the XXth century had experienced cruel and brutal policy of oppression and discrimination towards people of other race and confession.

Lynching is the most famous type of social oppression invented during difficult times of political and economic instability. Initially, this type of punishment appeared before the Civil War in the United States and was assigned to control rebelled society. Lynch law itself was a capital punishment for any delinquent who had committed a serious crime. The only difference was that no juries were necessary to pass a sentence. Moreover, lynching was not always a death penalty but beating or another type of punishment. Actually, it presented the simplified type of justice of wartime.

Later, under the pressure of social and political processes lynching was transformed into the policy of oppression and discrimination. History of American society witnessed numeral cases of killing innocent black people, which did not commit any crime. Lynching became the expression of total hatred towards black people. It served no more for social control but for stirring racism.

One more example of oppression and discrimination of humans was the internment of the Japanese during World War II. The internment meant the separate places on the territory of the USA, where Japanese were exiled. Such attitude to Japanese people was provoked by the famous attack of Pearl Harbour, where American army was defeated.

To sum up, it should be mentioned that any expression of racism is cruel and inhuman. Moreover, it has nothing in common with the patriot act today, even if any good intentions could be seen. No good intentions appear from the cruel attitude. Evil gives birth to evil. Hatred gives birth to hatred and leads to blood and death. History is a sum of all human choices. However, the choices must be done carefully.

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