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Criminal Justice Communication

The two common language acquisition theories are; child acquisition theory and child imitation theory. In child acquisition theory, it is believed that children have an inborn ability to acquire learning of any human knowledge. According to Chomsky, children could be having well laid out structures in their minds that help them to learn a particular language. Chomsky further emphasizes that with these structures children only need to learn vocabularies, and then absorb in these structures thus forming sentences.

This theory argues that children cannot learn through imitating the adults alone, since adults use broken sentences at times. This theory could be true since children do not make grammatical mistakes; they instead use adjectives, verbs and pronouns well. (Guiora 1972) Children normally come up with sentences that have not been heard before; this is in support of this theory. Although this arguments support this theory, other people say that this theory does not necessarily prove that children have “the language acquisition device” in their brains. The second theory of imitation is where theorists believe that children acquire a new language through imitating their parents. It is said that children repeat what their caregivers say and more often they are looking at their mothers tongue.

This theory emphasizes that children mimic every sound, word and sentence. It is said that before a child can read and write, he or she listens and understands. This is said to be a natural order. The third theory of language acquisition combines these two theories. It emphasizes that a child acquires a language through mimicking and their inborn ability.

This third theory is realistic in that it has been observed in many children. As much as a child has inner ability to acquire knowledge, the child also relies on the parents for more words and creation of sentences.