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Making Malcolm and Martin

Racial prejudice was heightened in the United States during the days of slavery in the 16th century up until mid 20th century when the Black people rose up and fought off the oppressor’s power through demonstrations and protests. The church equally participated in the demonstrations and remonstrations to seek justice. Seemingly, the states enacted laws and ordinances that supported racial prejudice through the establishment of separate schools for black people and white people, separate sitting arrangements in buses and even separate working places. I concur with the African American protest against racial discrimination and mistreatment as an excellent move that enhanced realization of true democracy in America.

Martin Luther King with an assembly many volunteers demonstrated against racial prejudice in Alabama Montgomery. I agree with Martin Luther’s reaction to counter the arrest of Rosa by calling on protest to end mistreatment from bus operators. According to Carson, the editor of The Autobiography of Martin Luther King During in December of 1955, Mrs. Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give her seat to a white passenger; four days later in December 5th 1955, Dr. King was elected as the new head of a protest group, the Montgomery Improvement Association.

A bus boycott and protest took place with the participation of civic leaders, white people, black people and the church that condemned the racial injustice that existed in the transport and political system of America. Mrs. Rosa was found guilty of contravening the city segregation ordinance and fined $14 dollars; a case that she appealed. The history of slavery and racial discrimination during the 1950s and 1960s aroused Black people to fearlessly question the credibility of the segregation laws in the face of the United States Constitution and declaration of independence that assumed all men were equal.

Discount

Equally, according to The Origin of the Trouble over 120,000 people marched down Montgomery in Alabama together with Dr. King as their leader during the December 5th, 1955 to protests against Montgomery City Lines buses and other public transport firms that employed the segregation ordinances. The black women Political Council, the church and other groups complained about mistreatment and abusive nature of the city transport sector. Many black were arrested for sitting in the first four seats that are usually reserved exclusively for the white race.

Countless black women and children had been arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and many were fined. The black women Political Council maintained that their mission as part of the Montgomery people was to inspire all blacks to live above mediocrity by strict observation of the law that did protect their rights (Jo 3).Men of Montgomery were afraid to call for a reform of the segregation and racial laws since they never objected the order that blacks sit from behind the bus while whites sit from the front.

Conclusively, true democracy was established once the American Congress revokes racial schools and discriminated public transport sector by replacing the same with the positive philosophy of integration. Mass protests and demonstrations action by Negros against the ordinances that upheld abuses like racial segregation was a positive gain for Americans. Eventually, sanity was restored to the former system whereby white bus operator did force old and sick Black people out of their sits for the white children to sit.